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 Post subject: Re: What is a Radiant Oscillator?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 1:22 am 
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Sorry I don't have scope. But I doubt it will have h wave because some friends who try stingo only observe h wave with battery as load. On other load the scope show a series of sharp spike.

But, some friend and TPU experimenter mention we will get OU if we can get sine wave out of our spike. Like this bellow for instance:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsp770Qi2Cw


I think h wave is needed for battery charging.


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 Post subject: Re: What is a Radiant Oscillator?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 3:54 am 
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Yes it’s a bit like that, but what I think is happening there is slightly different.

The radiant is a vertical line at the start (or end) of the pulse that extends above (or below) the rest of the wave and seems to be missing on that trace. Maybe it has been absorbed by a capacitor or battery. The down slope is the BEMF, coil collapse or radiant converting to current flow, followed by a coil oscillation.

If the voltage was considerably more than the source then the radiant has been converted to current.

My trace is across the coil, sorry its not very clear, as the coil becomes positive there is a negative spike and as the power goes off there is a positive spike. This is where we split the positive and this is what we use with the SSG and IRO. When the coil is off the voltage reverses and you see the coil collapse. Note its voltage and power is less than the input.

When we show the spike only (put the probe on the output diode) we see a vertical line with a small slope at the bottom as the radiant converts to current.

When we do not collect the spike it just converts to higher voltage current in the collapse but a lot is lost back to the environment. This is the magnifying part of the magnifying transmitter; it’s like an amplifying effect that we get for free.

If your transistor does not switch fast enough you don’t get the spike or it will be reduced dramatically. This is why mechanical switching or spark gaps are superior, especially if quenched.

Depending where you place your probes you can get different versions of this wave.

I blew my transistor making the trace.

Some semiconductors can produce huge spikes because of their high impedance and fast switching; you want to switch but resist currant flow at the switch and collect the radiant before the switch for higher radiant. The better the conductivity of the collector circuit the more radiant will be present; this is why low inductor impedance is best with low impedance to the charging battery.

Some types of doped wire have been found to be exceptional at this.


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 Post subject: Re: What is a Radiant Oscillator?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 3:37 am 
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I still do not get it. Do you have a scope show that show vertical line at the start of a pulse?


Can you retest it with only coil, mechanical switch and source power?


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 Post subject: Re: What is a Radiant Oscillator?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 6:55 am 
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In this first image, the lower trace is taken across the coil, the scale is 10v per graduation and you can see no spikes visible. The upper trace is on the collector of the transistor at the same scale and spikes can be clearly seen. This image was taken before I blew my transistor and with a battery being charged. I can only suggest that the radiant is not visible in itself but is made visible by the capacitance of the transistor.

The second image is from Jetijs when he was experimenting with Bedini and I believe it was taken across the transistor

I can retest this when I get my new transistors. To do it mechanically I will need to get a relay etc

Hope this helps


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 Post subject: Re: What is a Radiant Oscillator?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 8:14 am 
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Thanks .

It seems on toroid that never happen.


Here is sine wave formed after spike, by 7imix:
Image

No spike during pulse on:
Image

From big toroid, by Farmhand, a bouncing wave after pulse off:
Image


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